How I Practice Using the Saxtalk Colored Scales

A few weeks ago, I introduced a new concept on Saxtalk.com: colored scales. While the concept of associating sounds with colors is not new, I think that my approach is different than anything that I have seen before. I am largely a visual learner, and I wanted to use a spreadsheet to automatically convert musical notes to colors. The same note would ALWAYS be associated with same color. In this way, I could impress engrams in my brain representing notes associated with colors.

Writing sheet music is often a slow process. I wanted something very fast and very accessible. A spreadsheet is very good at taking information and doing automatic calculations very quickly. So I could input a single set of notes into the spreadsheet, and it would rapidly calculate the relationship between the notes in all twelve keys. 

So How Do I Practice Using the Colored Scales?

Everyday, I go here: https://saxtalk.com/colored_scales.html I pick a few of the types of scales to practice. I ALWAYS practice with a metronome, so I first set my metronome to one of the Quantum Levels. If it is late, I practice silently using my electronic saxophone (a Roland AE-10 digital wind synthesizer).

Once I have picked the tempo, I am ready to practice. I just play my saxophone, running my fingers up and down each scale, creating and/or strengthening the imprint of that scale in my brain. Will I consciously remember the colors of each note? Probably not. But the subconscious mind is EXTREMELY powerful, and I think that this practice method will cause very real and very valuable development of my playing in the long run.

Here is a sample of what I am looking at while I am practicing (Harmonic Minor Scales starting on B-flat and B):

If you are in a situation where you can't play your horn audibly, just use the Colored Scales to silently run your fingers up and down the scales. 

A few days ago, I started work on Colored Chords, and I will release those on Saxtalk in the coming months.

Happy Practicing!

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